Cold Articles A-Z

Benzonatate and Breastfeeding - Chronic Sinusitis

This page contains links to eMedTV Cold Articles containing information on subjects from Benzonatate and Breastfeeding to Chronic Sinusitis. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Benzonatate and Breastfeeding
    If you are breastfeeding, it's important to talk to your doctor before taking benzonatate (Tessalon). This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at using this drug in women who are nursing, including information on whether it passes through breast milk.
  • Benzonatate and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the full risks of taking benzonatate (Tessalon) during pregnancy are unknown. This article offers more information for women who are expecting, including how benzonatate is classified by the FDA.
  • Benzonatate Dosage
    Typically, benzonatate capsules are taken by mouth up to three times a day. This article from the eMedTV archives offers an overview of benzonatate dosing guidelines and explains why the medication should never be sucked or chewed.
  • Benzonatate Drug Information
    Benzonatate is a medication used for the treatment of coughing in adults and children over the age of 10. This eMedTV resource contains more drug information on benzonatate, including details on how the medicine works and a list of potential side effects.
  • Benzonatate Overdose
    Taking too much benzonatate (Tessalon) could lead to mouth numbness, choking, seizures, and other problems. This eMedTV Web article describes other potential symptoms of an overdose and explains the likely treatment options.
  • Benzonatate Side Effects
    Nausea, constipation, and nasal congestion are some of the possible side effects of benzonatate. This eMedTV segment offers a more detailed list of side effects that may occur, including potentially dangerous problems requiring immediate medical care.
  • Benzonotate
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, benzonatate is a medication used to stop coughing. This article gives an overview of this drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Benzonotate is a common misspelling of benzonatate.
  • Best Medicine for a Sore Throat
    Over-the-counter (OTC) medications are the best medicine for a sore throat. This eMedTV Web resource further describes which OTC medicines can help reduce pain and fever caused by a throat infection, and outlines other possible home remedies.
  • But Perhaps Consider Zinc
    While research isn't convincing for vitamin C, zinc looks a bit more promising. Very popular for cold prevention and treatment (think Zicam), zinc supplements might actually be worth a try. Studies suggest that starting zinc within the first 24 hours of a cold may lessen its severity and shorten its duration.
  • Cause and Cure of the Common Cold
    As this eMedTV article explains, researchers have studied the cause and cure of the common cold for years. The cause is viral in nature; the cure remains unknown. This Web page discusses these topics in detail and provides links to more information.
  • Causes of Acute Sinusitis
    As this eMedTV article explains, the most common cause of an acute sinus infection is a virus. This resource takes a closer look at what can cause sinusitis, including information on bacteria and fungi responsible for the condition.
  • Causes of Common Cold
    Viruses are the causes of the common cold -- there are more than 200 viruses that can cause colds. This eMedTV resource discusses these and other possible common cold causes, such as rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and parainfluenza.
  • Causes of Pneumonia
    Community-acquired pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses, and fungi, among other things. This eMedTV selection takes a closer look at the organisms responsible for causing both community- and hospital-acquired pneumonia.
  • Ceftin
    Ceftin is commonly prescribed to treat infections such as strep throat, ear infections, or sinus infections. This eMedTV page describes how this antibiotic works, potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and general safety precautions.
  • Ceftin 250 mg Tablets
    If you have strep throat, your doctor may prescribe 250 mg Ceftin tablets. This eMedTV resource further explores Ceftin dosing guidelines, including some tips on when and how to take this antibiotic.
  • Ceftin and Breastfeeding
    It is generally considered safe to use Ceftin (cefuroxime axetil) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV page discusses this topic further, including an explanation as to why this drug is considered safe while nursing even though it passes through breast milk.
  • Ceftin and Pregnancy
    The FDA has determined that it is probably safe for pregnant women to use Ceftin (cefuroxime axetil). This eMedTV article describes the results of animal studies involving this medication and covers what to discuss with your doctor before taking Ceftin.
  • Ceftin Antibiotic Information
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Ceftin is a medication prescribed for treating certain types of bacterial infections. This article offers important information on the antibiotic, including Ceftin's possible side effects and general safety precautions.
  • Ceftin Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV page, several factors will affect your dosage of Ceftin, such as the type of infection you have and other medicines you are taking. This page takes an in-depth look at dosing guidelines, including helpful tips on taking Ceftin.
  • Ceftin Drug Interactions
    Diuretics, birth control pills, and probenecid are a few of the medications that can react with Ceftin. This eMedTV Web resource describes other negative Ceftin drug interactions, as well as the potential problems these reactions can cause.
  • Ceftin Overdose
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, an overdose of Ceftin (cefuroxime axetil) may potentially cause seizures. This article takes a closer look at what could happen when people take too much Ceftin and explains when to contact a doctor.
  • Ceftin Side Effects
    The most commonly reported side effects of Ceftin include diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV article offers a detailed list of other potential side effects seen with this drug and explains which reactions may require prompt medical care.
  • Ceftin Tablets
    This eMedTV page explains that Ceftin comes in tablet and liquid form and is typically taken twice daily. This resource briefly describes general dosing guidelines and provides a few important tips for how to take this prescription antibiotic safely.
  • Ceftin Uses
    As this page of the eMedTV Web site explains, Ceftin is prescribed to treat various bacterial infections in adults and children. This page takes a closer look at what Ceftin is used for, including how this drug works and possible off-label uses.
  • Ceftin Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Ceftin, tell your doctor if you have any health conditions, such as kidney disease. This eMedTV Web segment discusses other warnings and precautions for the antibiotic, and explains why Ceftin may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Chloropheniramine
    Chlorpheniramine is a medicine licensed to treat allergies, hives, and the common cold. This eMedTV article explains how the medication works and lists possible side effects to be aware of. Chloropheniramine is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorphen
    Chlorpheniramine is a medication approved to treat the common cold, allergies, and hives. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how the medication works and describes its effects. Chlorphen is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorphenamine
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine found in many allergy and cold medications. This eMedTV page describes how the drug works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before taking it. Chlorphenamine is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorpheneramine
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine often used to treat allergies, hives, and the common cold. This eMedTV article describes how the drug works and offers general warnings for the product. Chlorpheneramine is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorpheniramine
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine drug approved to treat the common cold, allergies, and hives. This eMedTV resource explains how the medication works, offers general dosing information, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Chlorpheniramine 4 mg Tablets
    A typical dosage for immediate-release chlorpheniramine 4 mg tablets is one tablet every four to six hours. This eMedTV resource also provides dosing guidelines for extended-release chlorpheniramine products and explains how dosing works for children.
  • Chlorpheniramine 8 mg
    Two strengths are available for extended-release chlorpheniramine: 8 mg and 12 mg capsules or tablets. This eMedTV Web page contains chlorpheniramine dosing guidelines for children and adults for both immediate-release and extended-release products.
  • Chlorpheniramine and Breastfeeding
    It is currently unknown whether chlorpheniramine passes through breast milk. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at chlorpheniramine and breastfeeding, and explains how this medication could potentially affect a woman's milk supply.
  • Chlorpheniramine and Pregnancy
    Chlorpheniramine is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV page describes the studies that have been conducted on chlorpheniramine and pregnancy, and explains whether antihistamines are generally safe for pregnant women.
  • Chlorpheniramine Dosage
    There are various dosing guidelines for chlorpheniramine, depending on the product. As this eMedTV page explains, a typical dose is 4 mg every 4 to 6 hours (for immediate-release forms) or 8 to 12 mg every 8 to 12 hours (for extended-release forms).
  • Chlorpheniramine for Allergies
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine drug found in many prescription and over-the-counter products. As this eMedTV page explains, many people use chlorpheniramine for allergies, but the drug is also approved for treating the common cold and hives.
  • Chlorpheniramine for the Common Cold
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine used in numerous prescription and non-prescription medications. As this eMedTV article explains, the drug is approved for several uses; you may use chlorpheniramine for the common cold, allergies, or hives.
  • Chlorpheniramine Liquid
    There are currently three different forms of chlorpheniramine: liquid, tablets, and capsules. This page from the eMedTV archives offers information on what chlorpheniramine is used for and describes the specific effects of this medication.
  • Chlorpheniramine Maleate
    Chlorpheniramine maleate is an antihistamine used in many prescription and over-the-counter drugs. This eMedTV segment discusses specific uses, explains how the medicine works, lists possible side effects to be aware of, and more.
  • Chlorpheniramine Maleate Dosage
    Depending on the particular form of chlorpheniramine maleate, dosing guidelines will vary. This part of the eMedTV library explains what a typical dosage is for adults taking either immediate-release or extended-release chlorpheniramine products.
  • Chlorpheniramine Medication Information
    Are you looking for info on chlorpheniramine? This eMedTV Web page is for you. We provide basic information on what this drug is used for, dosing, side effects, and safety issues you should consider before taking it, with a link to learn more.
  • Chlorpheniramine Overdose
    An overdose of chlorpheniramine may cause drowsiness, flushing, and rapid breathing. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible symptoms of an overdose and describes the steps that a healthcare provider may take to treat these symptoms.
  • Chlorpheniramine Side Effects
    Common side effects of chlorpheniramine include nausea, headaches, and diarrhea. This article on the eMedTV Web site also lists some of the less common but potentially serious side effects of this medication that require medical attention.
  • Chlorpheniramine Tablets
    There are several basic forms of chlorpheniramine: tablets, capsules, and liquid. This article from the eMedTV site describes chlorpheniramine in more detail, explaining how the medication works and its various effects, with links to more information.
  • Chronic Sinus Infection
    The term "chronic sinus infection" is not really accurate. This eMedTV segment explains why this is the case and gives an overview of chronic sinusitis, including information on its treatment. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Chronic Sinus Infection Treatments
    As this eMedTV page explains, treatment options for chronic sinusitis (sometimes called a chronic sinus infection) may include medications, home remedies, and surgery. This resource discusses these treatments and offers links to more information.
  • Chronic Sinusitis
    Chronic sinusitis is a type of sinus inflammation that lasts 12 weeks or longer, despite treatment. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at this condition, including what causes it, possible symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Chronicsinusitis
    Chronic sinusitis refers to a sinus infection that has lasted 12 weeks or longer, even with treatment. This eMedTV page discusses the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this type of sinusitis. Chronicsinusitis is a common misspelling of chronic sinusitis.
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